Category Archives: Homo academicus

Anything about research

Salah interpretasi p-value

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Image: N. Johnston, http://www.statdistributions.com/normal/

 

Ionnidis (2005, PLoS Medicine) bilang, “most published research claims are false”. Paper yang kesimpulannya salah jumlahnya lebih dari 50% dari semua publikasi. Ini jumlah yang ga main-main. Menanggapi hal itu, Goodman & Greenland S (2007) menyebutkan bahwa salah satu penyebabnya adalah kesalahan dalam penggunaan dan interpretasi p-value.

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Giant clams population in Kei Kecil waters, Indonesia

Giant clams, the largest bivalves in the world, belongs to the subfamily Tridaninae, family Cardiidae. They have two conspicuous characteristics, relatively huge in size and brightly colored expanded mantles harboring symbiotic algae. They can be found living in association with coral reefs throughout the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region.
People have utilized the clams for food, shellcraft industries, and aquarium. Unfortunately, growing demand of the clams has led to over-fishing on the wild populations throughout the Indo-Pacific region including Indonesian waters. Their natural stocks have been dramatically declining since 1980. Responding the trend, the clams are then listed on the 2008 IUCN Red List of Threatened Species.
The aim of this study is to assess the species composition, density and size distribution of giant clams in Kei Kecil waters. The obtained data provides baseline information for conservation management policy.
For more details, please visits here!

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Inventarisasi Jenis dan Potensi Moluska Padang Lamun di Kepulauan Kei Kecil, Maluku Tenggara

Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui jenis dan potensi moluska di padang lamun kawasan kepulauan Kei Kecil, Maluku Tenggara. Hasil penelitian ini dapat digunakan sebagai dasar dalam pembuatan kebijakan tentang pengelolaan sumber daya alam hayati laut yang lestari.

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Giant clams (Tridacninae) in Indonesia

Giant clams, the largest bivalve in the world, occur naturally in association with coral reefs throughout the tropical and subtropical waters of the Indo-Pacific region. From the southeast Pacific westwards to East Africa, its distribution extends up north to the Red Sea (bin Othman et al. 2010). They can generally be found in marine shallow water habitats (1 – 20 m) and are restricted in only clear waters due to their phototrophic characteristic (Jantzen et al. 2008). Their strong requirement of photosynthetic light is a consequence of their symbiotic relationship with zooxanthellae of the genus Symbiodinium (Hirose et al. 2006).

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Authorship, Kolaborasi dan Angka Kredit

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Dari akhir abad 17 sampai sekitar tahun 1920an, paper ilmiah biasa ditulis oleh satu penulis. Namun, mulai tahun 1950an, “aturan 1 paper-1 penulis” mulai ditinggalkan. Rata-rata jumlah penulis per paper pada jurnal ilmiah terus meningkat dari 1,5 penulis/paper pada tahun 1960, naik jadi 2 di tahun 1980, jadi 3,18 di tahun 1990, dan terus meningkat jadi 4,83 penulis/paper pada tahun 2010. Sebaliknya, proporsi paper dengan satu penulis semakin menurun dari 35 persen tahun 1980 menjadi sekitar 11 persen di tahun 2012.

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Seagrass connectivity in the hotspot of marine biodiversity

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Most marine populations are spatially separated, but interconnected by individual movement described as connectivity. Population connectivity is a vital component in maintaining population persistence and resilience, thus highly relevant to conservation. It allows gene flow to spread advantageous genes and avoid local inbreeding. It also reduces the risk of local extinctions by facilitating continuous recruitment from other sites.

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